top of page
  • Amy Teague

Part 1: Women Pioneering Cybersecurity

Traditionally, the tech industry has been perceived as a male-dominated domain, with women often facing barriers to entry and advancement. However, the tide is turning, and women are seizing opportunities in cybersecurity with determination and skill.


From threat analysts to ethical hackers, from cybersecurity researchers to CISOs, women are breaking barriers and reshaping the industry. According to the international cybersecurity membership organization (ISC)2, women make up 24% of the cybersecurity workforce, with much lower percentages in some parts of the world. Despite progress, challenges persist. The (ISC)2 study revealed that 30% of female employees feel discriminated against at work. Women need mentors. The cybersecurity field is 3.4 million workers short of demand. And bringing more women on board is one of the ways to address the issue.



I think it’s important that women who may be considering a career in cybersecurity see role models for inspiration. I wanted to do this in my two-part blog post by highlighting some exceptional women who are driving positive change in the cybersecurity industry through their expertise, leadership, and dedication.


Parisa Tabriz: Leading Google's Security Initiatives

Parisa Tabriz, widely known as Google's "Security Princess," is a trailblazer in cybersecurity innovation. As the Director of Engineering at Google, she spearheads the Chrome security team, driving efforts to enhance the security of one of the most widely used web browsers globally. Tabriz's expertise and leadership have been instrumental in fortifying Google's security infrastructure and safeguarding millions of users worldwide.


Eva Galperin: A Champion for User Privacy Rights

Eva Galperin, Director of Cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), is a fierce advocate for user privacy rights in the digital age. Through her work at EFF, Galperin focuses on exposing and combating cyber espionage and government surveillance. Her dedication to protecting digital liberties has earned her recognition as a leading voice in the fight for online privacy.


Lorrie Faith Cranor: Pioneering Usable Privacy and Security

Lorrie Faith Cranor, Director of the CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University, is at the forefront of research on usable privacy and security. Cranor's work delves into topics such as passwords, online privacy, and human factors in security. Her research insights have paved the way for more user-friendly and secure digital experiences.


Keren Elazari: Illuminating Hacker Culture and Innovation

Keren Elazari, an internationally recognized cybersecurity analyst and researcher, sheds light on hacker culture and innovation. Through her TED Talks, writings, and advocacy work, Elazari highlights the positive contributions of hackers and the importance of hacker-driven innovation in cybersecurity. Her insights challenge conventional wisdom and inspire new approaches to defending against cyber threats.


As a woman in cybersecurity and President of Rekruitd, I'm dedicated to encouraging more women to join this fulfilling field. In Part 1 of our series on Women in Cybersecurity, we've introduced just a few remarkable women who are shaping the future of cybersecurity through their leadership, advocacy, and innovation. Stay tuned for Part 2, where we'll continue to explore the contributions of women in this dynamic industry.



 

Comentarios


bottom of page